BIBLIOGRAPHY

NOTE: The items in BOLD are of special relevance to this presentation.
  • Abramson, J. (2005). Overdosed America, Harper.
  • Angell, M. (2004). The Truth About the Drug Companies, Random, American Psychiatric Association (2000) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text revision) Washington, DC: APA.
  • BBC News (2008/02/26), New generation antidepressants have little clinical benefit for most patients, research suggests. news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr . (In this posting it is reported that Alan Johnson, the Health Secretary, has announced that 3,600 therapists are to be trained, which the minister sees as a better alternative to drugs. Funding is to be discontinued for SSRIs in Britain.)
  • Bloom, M., Fischer, J., Orme, J., (2003) Evaluating PracticeGuidelines for the Accountable Professional. 4th ed. Allyn & Bacon (this is the text I used in designing my single case series study (Ferrie 2006))
  • Brewin C.R. (2001), A cognitive neuroscience account of post traumatic stress disorder and its treatment. Behav Res Ther. 39(4):373-93.
  • Brewin, C.R. (2005), Systematic review of screening instruments for adults at risk of PTSD. J.Traumatic Stress 18(1): 53-62.
  • Caraco, Y., (2004), Genes and the response to drugs. N Engl J Med 351(27):2867-69 (he discusses why there is variation in the response to the same dose of a pharmaceutical drug).
  • CPS 2008 (Compendium of Pharmaceutical Specialties, Canadian Pharmacists Association) (this drug reference book is found in every doctor’s office and pharmacy in Canada and is annually updated).
  • Davidson,J. et al (2006) Treatment of PTSD with venflaxine extended release: a 6 month randomized controlled trial. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 63(10):1158-65 (As in all similar articles an effect is not a cure; there likely is a conflict of interest.)
  • DeAngelis, C.D., Fortanarosa, P.B. (2008) Impugning the integrity of medical science: The adverse effects of industry influence, JAMA, 299(15):1833-1835 (When interviewed about this article she said “We have given away our profession and we have got to get it back.”).
  • Ellison. S, (2005). Health Myths Exposed, Author House.
  • EMDR (2008) www.emdr.com (the website of the EMDR Institute with access to various articles about EMDR).
  • Ferrie, R.K., (2006) Transforming imagery in the treatment of complex PTSD. EMDR International Association Conference Philadelphia.
  • Ferrie, R.K., (2004) Problems with SSRIs in the treatment of traumatic syndromes. EMDR International Association Conference , Montreal. (A teen age boy who almost murdered his mother and sister on an SSRI, and became a patient of mine, got me interested in this topic.)
  • Ferris, L.E. (2002). Industry-sponsored pharmaceutical trials and research ethics boards: Are they cloaked in too much secrecy?, CMAJ, 166.10.
  • Forbes D et al, (2003) Imagery rehearsal therapy in the treatment of post traumatic nightmares in Australian veterans with chronic combat related PTSD. J. Traumatic Stress. 5:509-13.
  • Freeman, M.P., Hibbelin, J.R., Stoll, A.L. et al. (2006) Omega-3 fatty acids: evidence basis for treatment and future research in psychiatry. J.Clin Psychiatry; 67(12):1954-67.
  • Goozner, M., (2004). The $ 800 Million Pill, University of California Press. (The former financial editor of the Chicago Tribune details in this book how drugs are developed for financial purposes and how the known deadly side effects are deliberately suppressed.)
  • Healy, D., (2004) Paxil and Prozac Can Make People Homicidal. Guardian Sept 24, (He reports seeing trials using normal volunteers who became unaccountably aggressive, also presented to the US Congressional Committee on Safety and Efficacy concerns in antidepressants use in children September 23, 2004.)
  • Healy, D., (2003). Let Them Eat Prozac, Lorimer. (This is Dr. Healy’s account of how the regulatory agencies of the world, especially the FDA were duped into approving the SSRI’s because the adverse events of specifically suicide and violence were concealed by the manufacturer; he also describes the process of exposing these facts. Dr. H. reported on these findings in January 2004 in Ottawa at a conference held by the Canadian Health Coalition.)
  • Hildebrandt, A. (2008) Canada’s military suicide rate doubled in a year, documents show, CBC News April 19, 2008 The rate jumped from 20.7 to 41.4/ 100,000. A rate triple that in the general population.
  • Hoffer, A. (2005) Adventures in Psychiatry: The Scientific Memoirs of Dr. Abram Hofer, Kos 2005. (Here Dr. Hoffer describes the evolution of nutritional medicine specific to mental health issues and how these developments were assisted especially by Tommy Douglas during the latter’s tenure as the Premier of Saskatchewan. Dr. Hoffer was a professor of psychiatry at the University of Saskatchewan. This book contains a complete bibliography of his own research as well as the most important work internationally in this field. Dr. Hoffer has testified several times before various parliamentary committees in Ottawa in the recent decade.)
  • House of Commons UK Government (2004-05). The Influence of the Pharmaceutical Industry, Fourth Report of Session, Volume 1 (“Almost from the onset, there was concern about two main problems with SSRIs. First, there was suspicion (initially centered on Prozac) that these drugs induce suicidal and violent behaviour – infrequently, but independently of suicidal thoughts linked to depression itself. There was also concern … about the risk of dependence; some users found it impossible to stop SSRIs because of severe withdrawal symptoms.” “suicidal thoughts and hostility are twice as common … in the months following drug withdrawal, as in those receiving placebo.” )
  • Ioannidis, J.P.A., (2005) Why most published research findings are false. PloS Medicine, 2(8). (“There is increasing concern that most current published research findings are false”, an epidemiologist looks at how the data can be spun.)
  • Kasper, D.,L., et al (2005) Harrison’s Textbook of Internal Medicine, 16th Eds. (Of specific importance are the sections on drug action, adverse events in drug therapy, and the genetically anchored variation among different populations with regard to response to drugs.)
  • Kassirer, J. (2005). On The Take, Oxford University Press (Written by a professor of Medicine from Yale University and the long-time Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association, it details how the medical profession in North America is complicit in maintaining a profitable status quo with regard to drug therapies in spite of and with the full knowledge of their general lack of efficacy and their demonstrated dangers.)
  • Katz,L.Y., et al. (2008) Effect of regulatory warnings on antidepressant prescription rates, use of health services and outcomes among children, adolescents and young adults. CMAJ,178(8):1005-11 (there were more suicides, I wonder if this may be due to either a neglect of these adolescent patients or the effect of too rapid and mishandled withdrawal.)
  • Kirsch,I., et al, 2008. Initial severity and antidepressant benefits: a meta-Analysis of data submitted to the FDA . PloS Medicine 5(2) e45. (This was the article that looked again at 2002 article, “The Emperor’s New Drugs” which had attracted so much attention.)
  • Koenen, K.C., et al. (2008) Persisting PTSD symptoms and their relationship to functioning in Vietnam veterans: a 14-year follow-up. J. Traumatic Stress, 21(1):49-57.
  • Lacasse, J.R. et al (2005) Serotonin and depression: A disconnect between advertisements and the scientific literature. PloS Medicine 2(12) e392. (Reported association of violent suicide attempts with low CSF serotonin concentrations likely represent studies with flaws in their methodology.)
  • Larson, J.,(1999) Depression Free Naturally, Ballantine Books. (Here are found the protocols for weaning patients off antidepressants and other addictive drugs safely to ensure no sudden violent side-effects occur; it also provides the information on the brain chemistry involved and how to use nutritional medicine in depression and related conditions. These protocols were developed by Larson together with Dr. A. Hoffer and other orthomolecular medicine experts.)
  • Levine,J., (1997) Controlled trials of inositol in psychiatry. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 7(2):147-55.
  • Moynihan, R., Cassels, A., Selling Sickness, Nation Books, 2005(Co-authored by Canadian medical public policy expert from the University of British Columbia – Cassels – this book describes the “invention” of diseases by the pharmaceutical companies, depression among them, in order to re-cast them as a drug-dependent condition.) 
  • Palatnik,A., et al., (2001) Double-blind, controlled, crossover trial of Inositol versus fluovoxamine for treatment of panic disorder. J. Clin Psychopharmacol 21(3):335-9 (Inositol was twice as effective for panic and had no side effects, it was equally effective for depression.)
  • Panksepp J. (2004) editor, Textbook of Biological Psychiatry, John Wiley.
  • Peet, M., Glen, I., Horrobin, eds (1999), D., Phospholipid Spectrum Disorder in Psychiatry, Marius Press. (This is the source book for the information on essential fatty acids – EFAs – how they work and how they become depleted from various stressors.)
  • Prowsky, J.E., (2005) Supplemental niacinamide mitigates anxiety symptoms: three case reports. J. Molecular Medicine 20(3):167-78.
  • Ross, J., (2004) The Mood Cure, Penguin.
  • Taylor,M.J., Wilder,H., Bhagwagar,Z., Geddes,J., (2004) Inositol for depressive disorders. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(2): CD004049.
  • Tracy, A.B. (1991) Prozac – Panacea or Pandora’s Box?
  • Turner,E.H. et al, (2008) Selective publication of antidepressant trials and Its influence on apparent efficacy. N Engl J Med 17; 358(3) :252-60. (95% of published antidepressant trials were positive but the FDA data base only showed that 51% were positive.)
  • Shapiro, F. (2001) Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, Basic Principles Protocols and Procedures, 2nd edition , Guilford (standard text on EMDR).
  • Smith, R.. (2006) The Trouble With Medical Journals, Royal Society of Medicine Press Ltd. (Written by the former Editor-in-Chief of the British Medical Journal and the President of the British Medical Association). He details the profit-oriented policy of the leading medical journals in the world and how and why research that shows the dangers of drug therapies is simply not published. When asked at a lecture given on November 27th, 2007, at the University of Toronto: “Can you trust any medical journal?” He replied: ”No!”.
  • van der Kolk, B.A. et al. (2007) A randomized clinical trial of EMDR, fluoxetine, and pill placebo in the treatment of PTSD: treatment effects and long term maintenance. J. Clin Psychiatry 10(4)118 (see text for summary).
  • van der Kolk, B.A. (2004) Psychobiology of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Panskeep, J., Textbook of Biological Psychiatry p.319.
  • Watkins, J.G., Watkins, H., (1997) Ego States: Theory and Therapy, Norton (a therapy useful for adults traumatized as children).
  • Weather, F.W., Huska, J.A., Keane, T.M.(1991). The PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) available free on line through the National Center for PTSD.
  • Wild, J., (2005) Adult suicides linked to popular antidepressant, Nature, Aug, 486: 1073.

Important website: www.ssristories.com
Provides the information on the incidents of random shootings and violence as well as suicides involving patients on SSRIs and similar antidepressant drugs as well as when they are taken off them without proper supportive protocols. This website was started and is updated monthly by A.B. Tracy, author of Prozac – Panacea or Pandora’s Box ? 1991.

Regarding reliable medical journals, those currently available and of true integrity are the following: PloS Medicine, founded by Nobel laureate Harold Varmus, the discoverer of the oncogene and a leading cancer researcher; PloS is financed by authors and donations, takes no advertisements. It routinely investigates the pharmaceutical industry and exposes conflicts of interest in drug development and medical therapies in general. Open Medicine, founded by former editor-in-chief of the Journal of the Canadian Medical Association, Dr. John Hoey. Medical Veritas and the Journal of Orthomoleclar Medicine. There are a few other journals of sound integrity operating along the same lines as these ones listed; they are dedicated to specific areas in medicine not relevant to this presentation and, therefore, are not listed here.